Does Shopping at Costco, Sam's, or BJ's Actually Save You Money?

Does Shopping at Costco, Sam's, or BJ's Actually Save You Money?

http://www.fool.com/investing/2016/11/30/does-shopping-at-costco-sams-or-bjs-actually-save.aspx?source=iaasitlnk0000003

IBM is Laying Off Thousands of Workers and Hiring Thousands More

 

IBM is Laying Off Thousands of Workers and Hiring Thousands More. Is This the Future of Technology?

https://www.goodcall.com/news/ibm-laying-off-thousands-workers-hiring-thousands-future-technology-jobs-07456

 

Gen Y in Never Never Land

 

Gen Y in Never Never Land
Once upon a time there was a girl named Peggy, who decided not to grow up. 'I will not be an adult! You cannot make me!' she exclaimed. 'I will live off my parents, shop by day and cocktail by night. I want always to be a girl and always to have fun. In Never Never Land I am forever 21!'
Perhaps you're more familiar with Peggy's male counterpart, Peter. Peter is that cocky, devil-may-care guy whose social IQ appears to be lower than his actual age. He's the incessant 'adultolescent.' . From bizME, May, 2010

Read the article at: Gen Y in Never Never Land

 

Experts Weigh In: What’s Your Best Advice For Entrepreneurs?

 

Experts Weigh In: What’s Your Best Advice For Entrepreneurs?

http://blog.mycorporation.com/2016/11/experts-weigh-whats-best-advice-entrepreneurs/

 

Be Dependable - Earn Trust, Gain Results

 

Be Dependable - Earn Trust, Gain Results
Be honest with your people and you will win their trust. From Investor's Business Daily, Dec 11, 2009
Read the article at: Earn Trust Gain Results.

 

Computerworld query -- what happens in these types of organizations?

 

IT employees at EmblemHealth fight to save jobs
http://www.computerworld.com/article/3057581/it-careers/it-employees-at-emblemhealth-fight-to-save-jobs.html

 

Cubicle graveyards disrupting office harmony

 

Cubicle graveyards disrupting office harmony
Empty workspaces creating morale problem for those who remain
The blogosphere has begun to chronicle a disturbing phenomenon in offices around the country'  endless stretches of uninhabited desks and cubicles where friends and colleagues used to sit.
From MSNBS, May 25, 2009 Read the article at: Cubicle Graveyards

 

Young, Female and Unemployed

 

Young, Female and Unemployed, Human Resource Executive Online, Nov 14, 2011

New research finds half of young women reported being unemployed for at least one month during the recent downturn -- twice the rate of young men -- but the survey's methods incite some questions. And then there is the question of whether childbearing skews the numbers.

Dr. Billie Blair, president and CEO of Change Strategists Inc., says the report "does not sound like the reality that I know."
And she notes that not only is the report based on data collected about a year ago, but she questions the duration of unemployment that was asked about.
"One month's unemployment is nothing," she says. "It could just mean that they were taking a 'time out' after finishing school. That data marker is far too narrow to give any reliable data.
"Now, if it were 'experienced unemployment for six months or more', then we might be getting somewhere," she says.

Billie Blair, is an organizational psychologist and CEO of Change Strategists, Inc., a Los Angeles consultancy. From HumanResource Executive Online, Nov 14, 2011
Read the article at: Young, Female and Unemployed

 

Finding Talent in the Battered Economy Not as Easy as it Seems

 

Finding Talent in the Battered Economy Not as Easy as it Seems Although more qualified people have entered the job market lately, as layoffs mount, it does not necessarily make the recruiting process any easier. From California Executive, February 5, 2009

 

Women in STEM

 

Women in STEM: Past and Present, Scientista Magazine. Nov 12, 2011

Dr. Billie Blair, organizational psychologist and President/CEO of the international management-consulting firm, Change Strategists, Inc recently spoke with a client, a successful farmer from Virginia. He spoke about having recently entertained guests - a high-profile woman and her family- at his farm. He liked her; she had good family associations and she was pleasant. After spending the day with this smart, successful, prominent woman and her family, the farmer decided he thought her and her family were much like a Friday night football game. As we know, a football game involves coaches, players, quarterbacks, various supporters . . . and cheerleaders.

And he said, "I see her as a cheerleader,"  says Dr. Blair, "I hadn"t heard anything like that in years. Just when you think we've made many advancements and accomplishments, you come right back to the fifties when I grew up!

Why is it that women - regardless of their level of education or successes in medicine, politics, and law are still being compared to cheerleaders and are still making 78 cents to a man's dollar? If we look specifically at science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields, is gender diversity progressing or regressing? More importantly, does anyone care?

Billie Blair, is an organizational psychologist and CEO of Change Strategists, Inc., a Los Angeles consultancy. From Scientista Magazine, Nov 12, 2011
Read the article at: Women in STEM: Past and Present

 

Ten Ways Admins Can Make the Boss Look Good

 

Ten Ways Admins Can Make the Boss Look Good

What is the measure of an administrative professional? Some would say it's all about helping your manager do his job well, AKA making your boss look good. From my journalcourier, Monster Worldwide, November 3, 2008

 

RIM: The Icahn Man Cometh

 

RIM: The Icahn Man Cometh?, E-Commerce Times, Sept. 28, 2011

RIM investors appear exuberant at the prospect of Carl Icahn's rumored stake in the troubled company, but if the financier follows his usual m.o., it could mean the beginning of the end. "It would be disastrous for RIM," said Billie G. Blair, president and CEO of Change Strategies. "Icahn has done nothing but harm to the companies that he has interacted with."

Shares of Research In Motion (Nasdaq: RIMM) showed signs of life, jumping at least 6 percent Tuesday, on talk that investor Carl Icahn has acquired a stake in the company.

Neither RIM nor Icahn has commented publicly to confirm or deny the rumors. RIM did not respond to the E-Commerce Times' request for comment. Icahn is a so-called activist investor who takes stakes in struggling companies in order to push for strategies that would deliver more.

Billie Blair, is an organizational psychologist and CEO of Change Strategists, Inc., a Los Angeles consultancy. From E-Commerce Times, Sept 28, 2011
Read the article at: RIM: The Icahn Man Cometh?

 

Examine Staffing

 

Examine Staffing Accountability is a buzzword in business that is often associated with reprimand and blame. In reality, however, accountability has been shown to have positive effects on morale and performance by empowering the employee. From image, October 20, 2008

 

Three Ways to Plug Profitability Leaks

 

Three Ways to Plug Profitability Leaks, Union Bank Small Business Focus, 2011
Learn how you  and your employees  can identify and correct cash flow problems and make your business more successful.

In a challenging economy, lower sales and slower payments put more pressure on small businesses to improve their cash flow management. To maintain profitability, businesses must be extremely vigilant about payments and expenses, with an eye toward plugging profitability leaks. While watching expenses may not be as rewarding as pursuing new business, the payoff can be double: surviving tough times, and creating a solid footing for growth once business picks up.

Fortunately, you can plug many profitability leaks by following three key tactics. 1. Re-assess your needs

2. Improve your processes

3. Talk and listen to employees

Billie Blair, is an organizational psychologist and CEO of Change Strategists, Inc., a Los Angeles consultancy. From Union Bank Small Business Focus, 2011
Read the article at: Three Ways to Plug Profitability Leaks

 

Ethics Boost Productivity

 

Ethics Boost Productivity Ethics, properly communicated, can aid staff and increase productivity. From IBD, September 5, 2008

 

Three Strategies to Jumpstart Your Business

 

Three Strategies to Jumpstart Your Business, Union Bank Small Business Focus, 2011
Whether you are bouncing back from the downturn or simply looking for ways to energize your business, these tried-and-true strategies can help.

With the economy starting to rebound, businesses have the opportunity to recover lost income and gain competitive traction. A strategic move now can help boost productivity and garner the attention your company deserves.

Consider the following tips to help achieve your goals.

Jumpstart #1: Rethink Your Marketing

Jumpstart #2: Set Up a Partnership

Jumpstart #3: Tackle New Opportunities Billie Blair, is an organizational psychologist and CEO of Change Strategists, Inc., a Los Angeles consultancy. From Union Bank Small Business Focus, 2011
Read the article at: Three Strategies to Jumpstart Your Business

 

Winning the Bid

 

Winning the Bid, The Art of Capturing New Business An article from Costco Connection, March 2008 with Peter Fretty. Dr. Blair is a contributing expert.

 

Threat to State Workers

 

Threat to State Workers, Oct 15, 2011
California government employees, fearing that lawmakers may soon shut down a controversial program that boosts their retirement payouts, have flooded the state's largest pension system with inquiries and requests to purchase the benefit.

More than 12,000 members of the California Public Employees' Retirement System asked for price estimates to buy additional retirement service credit  sometimes called "airtime"  during the fiscal year that ended June 30. That was up 23 percent from 2009-10.

The trend continued this year, with roughly 1,000 workers making airtime cost requests in July and again in August, according to Cal-PERS.

More than 4,800 workers went ahead and purchased the benefit in 2010-11, a 16 percent increase over the previous year.

The spike in interest comes perhaps as a consequence of the raging debate over public pensions. Many observers expect Gov. Jerry Brown to renew a proposal to end airtime as one way to scale back costs.

"It's like a closeout sale," said group behaviorist Billie Blair, head of the Change Strategists Inc. management consulting firm in Southern California. "The governor probably didn't intend it, but suggesting that (the program) should end was good advertising."

Billie G. Blair, Ph.D., said that physicians need to relax and get to know the patient, fully understand the presenting complaint, explain the options and elicit the patient's support in order to make treatment a success.

Billie Blair, is an organizational psychologist and CEO of Change Strategists, Inc., a Los Angeles consultancy. From Scramento Bee, Oct 2011
Read the article at: Threat to State Workers Pensions

 

Career Path for an Admin

 

Career Path for an Admin
If your current administrative position is one rung on a career ladder and you‟re looking upward, then here‟s your next task: Figure out how to transition from where you are to where you want to be. Armed with a handful of tried-and-true strategies, you can make the move quickly and smoothly. Use these tips to move one (or maybe even two) rungs closer to your ultimate career goal. From CAREER, Sept 27, 2008

 

Patient-centered Care Found to Decrease Utilization

 

Patient-centered Care Found to Decrease Utilization,July 1, 2011
Adults receiving patient-centered primary care sought less care from specialists, received fewer imaging and diagnostic studies, and incurred fewer medical charges during a recent one-year study by researchers at the University of California Davis.

Billie G. Blair, Ph.D., said that physicians need to relax and get to know the patient, fully understand the presenting complaint, explain the options and elicit the patient's support in order to make treatment a success.

Billie G. Blair, Ph.D., president and CEO of Change Strategists, international management consultants, added that patient-centered care means having the patient directly involved in the determination and follow through for the course of treatment. That requires the physician take the time to fully understand the presenting complaint, clearly explain the options and elicit the patient's support for the treatment plan. "Better understanding of both illness and patient, plus better discussion between patient and physician, equates to far better outcomes of treatment," Blair said.

Billie Blair, is an organizational psychologist and CEO of Change Strategists, Inc., a Los Angeles consultancy. From AMN Healthcare. July, 2011
Read the article at: Patient-centered Care Found to Decrease Utilization

 

The State Worker:

 

The State Worker: Threat to cut pay tarnishes state's image as employer. Add this to the list of issues vexing California's state government: It's getting a reputation as a lousy boss. From Main News, July 31, 2008

 

Do Happy Staff = Happy Patients

 

Do Happy Staff = Happy Patients? May 10, 2011
Staff happiness represents only one piece of a very complex process.

Thomas Jefferson enshrined in this country's civil religion the "pursuit of happiness" as an unalienable right. But if a medical practice's staff is successful in that pursuit, does it translate into happy patients?

In a 2009 Harvard Business Review article, Rosa Chun, a professor of business ethics and corporate social responsibility, and Gary Davies, a professor of corporate reputation at Manchester Business School in the United Kingdom, wrote a brief article disputing the conventional wisdom that happy employees yield happy customers. Their study, they say, found no correlation between employee satisfaction and service. But others are skeptical�very skeptical.

Not surprisingly, those on both sides of the issue can point to research to support their position.

"There's a long line of research that shows that being happy to the extent that one takes care of personal needs only doesn't translate to good customer or patient care," says Billie Blair, PhD, president/CEO of Change Strategies, Inc., and the author of All The Moving Parts (Puzzles Press, 2007).

Billie Blair, an organizational psychologist and CEO of Change Strategists, Inc., a Los Angeles consultancy. From Modern Medicine.May 10, 2011
Read the article at: Do Happy Staff = Happy Patients?

 

What Is Your Weakness

 

When an Interviewer Asks, "What Is Your Weakness?" Please Don't Say Chocolate Most people have been asked to name their greatest weakness at during a job interview. I never prepared for it in advance. I just answered it, honestly and concisely. Career advisors recommend preparing for interviews by practicing how to answer various questions, including "What's your weakness?" From CollegeRecruiter, Sept 22, 2008

 

Developing A Store Manager - Pet Age

 

Developing A Store Manager - Pet Age, Aug, 2011
with Jeff Siegel
Molding a stellar employee into a top manager is no easy task. But with the right approach, you can make the process a little less daunting.

Ask pet retailers about turning employees into managers, and it seems like everyone has a horror story. How about the man who was humbleand hard-working until he got a little authority and started bossing everyone around, including the boss? Or the woman who was organized and collected until she became a manager and suddenly seemed to be hardly organized and collected at all?

So it's not surprising that elevating someone to management is even more complex than it seems according to Billie Blair, an organizational psychologist and CEO of Change Strategists, Inc., a Los Angeles consultancy. From Pet Age, Aug, 2011
Read the article at: Developing Managers

 

Have a laugh it'll lighten your load

 

Have a laugh it'll lighten your load. Having fun on the job can relieve stress, create bonds among co-workers and help companies get through genuine crises. From Portland Press Herald - Maine Sunday Telegram, April 1, 2008

 

Do NCAA Breackets belong in the office?

 

Do NCAA Breackets belong in the office?

Date: Friday, March 25, 2011, 3:00am PDT
Dennis McCoy|Sacramento Business Journal
Melanie Turner, Staff Writer
Clay Nutting, Ross Villegas and Alicia Allen study NCAA brackets at 3fold Communications in Sacramento. Staff have run an in-house contest for years.

It's that time of year: Offices are buzzing with March Madness.

Workers are talking about the latest results of the NCAA Division I men's basketball tournament. They're poring over brackets. And they're sneaking peeks at games on office computers, smart phones and tablets.

It's no wonder that the three-week annual event hurts productivity. But some experts say employers can see benefits from allowing workers to monitor the games  in moderation.

Challenger Gray & Christmas Inc. , a human resources consulting firm in Chicago, estimates that workers will spend 8.4 million hours watching the championship online.

Multiply that by average hourly earnings of $22.87 for private-sector employees and the financial impact exceeds $192 million.

The firm bases this estimate on 2010 March Madness On Demand traffic statistics from CBSSports.com, the site's primary sponsor. Last year the online streaming service attracted 8.3 million unique visitors who enjoyed 11.7 million hours of online video and audio  an average of about 1.4 hours per visitor.

With CBS Sports providing free mobile apps this year, Challenger estimates that streaming will increase at least 20 percent to about 14 million hours.

Chief executive officer John Challenger calls the lost productivity a relative drop in the bucket, accounting for less than one-tenth of 1 percent of the total hours American workers will put in over the three weeks of the tournament.

Basically, there is no measurable impact on the economy or even an individual company's bottom line,' Challenger said in a statement.

But if you ask department managers or IT staff whether March Madness has a noticeable effect on productivity, they are likely to answer in the affirmative, he said, noting that watching games can slow network speeds for everyone in the office.

Karen O'Hara, chief executive officer of HR to Go in Elk Grove, said technology allows people to participate in all sorts of outside interests and March Madness is one that surfaces annually.

It's a given that there's a lot of lost productivity, she said. And gambling in the workplace  a routine part of bracket contests  is illegal.

At the same time, she said, surveys have shown that allowing employees to monitor games online or on a break-room TV can boost morale.

Some employers embrace March Madness, sponsoring tournament pools to control the event and minimize disruptions.

Among these is 3fold Communications LLC, a marketing agency in midtown Sacramento. The company has had a staff-led office pool for the past four years.

'I really loved it last year because I won," president and chief executive officer Gordon Fowler said. This year I'm thinking it's not such a good idea because I'm toward the bottom of the middle of the pool.

At 3fold Communications the staff often does themed potlucks and other activities. This is just something else to rally around, said Fowler, who chooses his teams based on who has the best logo.

'Other people choose it based on a city they want to live in or they have friends and family in,' he said. 'It becomes kind of a collective great thing to talk about, laugh about.'

The 3fold winner gets a paid vacation day. The loser has to listen to a CD of Fowler's choice for a day.

He said he has no concerns about his employees being distracted.

'Everybody's still responsible to meet customer needs, get their billings in on time,' he said. 'I really believe that if that is a distraction that's more about the team that you have than the activity.'

Other companies take a different approach. You won't find brackets at Teichert Construction, for example. The extra-curricular activity would be frowned upon, said vice president Steve Mitchell.

'We like to keep business business and pleasure pleasure, so we don't promote that sort of activity,' he said.

Billie Blair, president and chief executive officer for Change Strategists Inc. in Los Angeles, said how employers manage diversions in the work place depends on the work setting. In a biotech manufacturing plant where critical devices are assembled in sterile conditions, you wouldn't want people wandering in and out to check scores, she said.

But in less restrictive environments, she said, 'Employers would be wise to, in effect, roll with the punches.'

She recommends that employers acknowledge employee interest and put the responsibility on the employee to figure out how to occasionally check scores or listen to games while continuing to meet the needs of the company.

Karen Arnold, managing partner of midtown's FutureDecisions LLC, said she would advise employers to allow employees to check scores and watch games during breaks and lunch hours.

'I don't know that I'd go out and buy a TV just for that, but I think we've got to give more latitude to have more of a life at work,' she said.

Arnold frequently talks to her clients about the need to treat employees as fully functioning human beings  'as opposed to supervising butts in seats.'

'We've looked at them as very expendable, but with 10,000 turning 65 every day, the financial crisis will turn around and they will start retiring,' she said. 'We need to start looking at employees as the valuable resource they are and not treat them as cogs.

'So if they're interested in this, work it out with them,'  she said.

Billie Blair, is an organizational psychologist and CEO of Change Strategists, Inc., a Los Angeles consultancy. From Scaramento Business Journal. March, 2011
Read the article at:

 

Globetrotting Entrepreneurs

 

Globetrotting Entrepreneurs - These adventurers run businesses while traveling the world. The globetrotting lifestyle is typically exclusive to jet-set, elite billionaires. But as offices go virtual and technology evolves, small-business owners are discovering they too can live out their globe-trekking dreams.

 

INSIDE EDGE - ready, set, hire

 

INSIDE EDGE - ready, set, hire
Companies need more workers again. But with budgets still tight and economic uncertainties on everyone's mind, it's tough to plan the best way to fill those workforce needs. Managers at companies that need more bodies have to decide whether to hire full-time employees, use temporary or contract workers or outsource key activities to third parties.
Smart companies are including their CFOs in this decision-making process to help drive economically-sound strategies for hiring, compensation and benefits.
Companies are increasingly asking finance executives to get out of the accounting department and involved in operations, including hiring, according to Billie Blair, an organizational psychologist and CEO of Change Strategists, Inc., a Los Angeles consultancy. From [INSIDE]EDGE, Nov 09, 2010
Read the article at: Ready, Set, Hire

 

SHARPEN YOUR LEADERSHIP SKILLS WITH EVIDENCE-BASED MANAGEMENT

 

SHARPEN YOUR LEADERSHIP SKILLS WITH EVIDENCE-BASED MANAGEMENT. Bring new insight into your decision-making process by relying on evidence and data, rather than past experiences. From Master Card Business Services, Professional Services, Resources & Tools, 2008 Read the article at: SHARPEN YOUR LEADERSHIP SKILLS WITH EVIDENCE-BASED MANAGEMENT.

CAREER COUCH - are you cut out for management?

 

CAREER COUCH - are you cut out for management?
They may call it a promotion, but moving into management is really like changing careers. 'It's a field unto itself,' says Billie G. Blair, an organizational psychologist and C.E.O. of Change Strategists, a management consultancy in Los Angeles. 'You will be doing things well outside the duties of your old job, and you have to learn management's literature, language and techniques.' From New York Times, CAREER COUCH, Jan 15, 2011
Read the article at: CAREER COUCH - are you cut out for management?

 

What is Green is Gold is becoming more and more fact

 

What is Green is Gold is becoming more and more fact in our environmentally sensitive world. Environmentally friendly business solutions can help you decrease costs, attract customers and ' oh yeah ' save the planet. From Floral Management, July 2007

 

Build A Better Meeting: Eight Steps to Success

 

Build A Better Meeting: Eight Steps to Success
Meetings are a vital tool for any workplace, but running an effective one is no easy task. Well-run meetings - those that start with a solid agendas, stay on track, and discuss matters important to the well-being of the organization - not only improve morale, but also help build teams and provide a way to keep employees informed and focused on a common goal. These eight steps will make your next meeting the most effective one yet. From CMA Today, Office Manager, Sep-Oct 2010
Read the article at: Build A Better Meeting

 

CREATIVE CONTROL

 

CREATIVE CONTROL, Even Bosses Need Time to Dream. Entreprenuers are creative people who follow passions and may toy with 101 ideas for a business before starting one. Then come the endless Things That Must Be Done! The creative edge can fall off in these day-to-day activities. Fun is sacrificed for the good of the business. What to do ...

 

Training the Revolving-Door CEO

 

Training the Revolving-Door CEO
Newly hired executives must be ready to roll right away. That means some serious onboarding. The revolving-door CEO is becoming a fixture of American companies, and is likely to remain so for some time. With executive tenure at a mere 2.5 years and a CEO turnover rate that increased 11 percent last year, newly hired executives must hit the ground running if they hope to be effective before moving on to their next jobs. From Society for Human resource Management, Nov, 2010
Read the article at: Training the Revolving-Door CEO

 

Best Buy toys with letting folks work whenever

 

Best Buy toys with letting folks work whenever. An article from The Coloradian, Business Section by Karen Mracek explores the new meaning of FLEX WORK being considered at Best Buy.

 

Training the Revolving-Door CEO

Training the Revolving-Door CEO
Newly hired executives must be ready to roll right away. That means some serious onboarding. The revolving-door CEO is becoming a fixture of American companies, and is likely to remain so for some time. With executive tenure at a mere 2.5 years and a CEO turnover rate that increased 11 percent last year, newly hired executives must hit the ground running if they hope to be effective before moving on to their next jobs. From Society for Human resource Management, Nov, 2010
Read the article at: Training the Revolving-Door CEO

Explain to people how it works sans much speak and not be able to generic online to a vivid proof. To argue this is not easy but is on occasion needfull.

Lets Make a Deal

 

Lets Make a Deal. Negotiate your way onto high-profile projects that benefit the company's bottom line, and you'll benefit , too. From PM NEtwork, November 2007

 

How To Spy On Rivals - Legally

 

How To Spy On Rivals - Legally
In many industries the difference among competing players is not very large. Often the best way to get an edge, if you can, is getting a gander at what the other guy is going to do before he does it. From National Post, June 7, 2010

  Read the article at: How To Spy On Rivals - Legally

Transforming People into Transformational Leaders

 

Transforming People into Transformational Leaders. An article from ExecuNet CareerSmartAdvisor with Dr. Larry G. Lee. Dr. Blair is a contributing expert.

 

Six Ways to Spy on Competition

 

Six Ways to Spy on Competition
Learning everything you can about your competition is time-consuming, but the return on investment is enormous. From Sija_English, Beijing Times, May, 2010 with Billie Blair, PhD
Read the article at: Six Ways to Spy on Competition

 

Showing Financial Data to Employees Can Improve Performance and Attitudes

 

the Books: Showing Financial Data to Employees Can Improve Performance and Attitudes.
Read what five owner/managers have to say

 

What is Chaos Theory and How Does It Apply to Your Organization?

 

What is Chaos Theory and How Does It Apply to Your Organization?
Have you ever made a seemingly innocuous statement, or executed a 'normal' business action and, in return, experienced surprisingly angry or retaliatory reactions? That is, reactions that were far out of proportion to your original intentions, that were meant as benign and 'inconsequential' acts? If so, you were experiencing, first hand, the results of Chaos Theory at work. From Wildapries, Feb 26, 2010
Read the article at: What is Chaos Theory and How Does It Apply to Your Organization?

 

CollegeRover

 

CollegeRover Exclusive Interviews with Dr. Blair. An article from CollegeRover, quotes Dr. Blair regarding "managing all the moving parts" in LIFE.

 

2010 Healthcare Hiring. What's the Prognosis?

 

2010 Healthcare Hiring. What's the Prognosis?
Who's got job security these days? Many healthcare employees do: the therapists, technologists, nurses and other professionals who carry out the provider's mission. In this recession-wracked labor market, isn't security enough for workers? No, it's not enough to retain those expensive-to-replace specialists and their hard-won skills and experience. From Monster.com, 2010
Read the article at: 2010 Healthcare Hiring. What's the Prognosis?

 

The Great Debate:

 

The Great Debate: Who'd Make the Better Boss, Romney or Obama?
An article from BusinessNewsDaily.com, quotes Dr. Blair.

 

Annul Your Job Choice

 

Annul Your Job Choice
What do you do when your new job turns out to be the wrong one? Are you trapped by commitment? Scared of the professional fallout? Relax, you can start over and survive. Here's how. From Monster.com, 2010
Read the article at: Annul Your Job Choice

 

How Do You Know What Clients Want

 

How Do You Know What Clients Want?
Published in The Leading Edge, Vol8, Winter 2008.

 

Worried Workers Don't Feel Comfortable Taking Long Vacations

 

Worried Workers Don't Feel Comfortable Taking Long Vacations
Vacation time is taking a hit as employers and workers alike struggle to make ends meet during the recession. From Sacramento Business Journal, Feb, 2010
Read the article at: Worried Workers Don't Feel Comfortable Taking Long Vacations

 

Leaders Should Be Transparent About Pluses, Minuses To Get Results

 

By STEVE WATKINS, FOR INVESTOR'S BUSINESS DAILY
Posted 12/20/2012 01:32 PM ET


Bosses must be transparent with their people, say leadership experts. That's especially true when it comes to opening up about your own pluses and minuses. Yet not enough people do it. A third of North American employees say their bosses are not as open about their own strengths and weaknesses as they should be. That's according to a survey by Arlington, Va.-based leadership consultant Healthy Cos. International.
 

Leaders can address the problem.
• Embrace openness. When people grasp their positives and negatives and freely discuss them, it opens things up so the group doesn't feel the need to be flawless. Instead, it can strive to excel without fearing a mistake, says Kathie Ross, Healthy Cos.' executive vice president of leadership development. "Perfection is not attainable," she told IBD. "What people want in a great leader is not perfection; it's authenticity."
• Draw out improvement. The level of trust people have in their bosses is declining, Ross says. If the chief is more transparent, the team will be more willing to push for better outcomes. "We're finding a strong correlation between being open and transparent, and the ability to achieve results," Ross said.
• Be open. Communication with employees — about the boss' strengths and weaknesses or other issues — is key to a firm's success, says Billie Blair, CEO of Los Angeles-based organizational change management firm Change Strategists. When companies underperform, communication is typically a big part of the problem. "Unless your employees know about you, you won't be able to take the company in the direction you want to go," she said. "When bosses feel comfortable enough with who they are and where they're going, then they're comfortable enough talking about their shortcomings."
• Take chances. When leaders fear taking a risk, they're not as likely to be open with others, says Blair, author of "The Blair Rules." Better to be in close contact with employees to see a project through.
"If you're talking to people, it'll reveal who you are and what you believe," she said.
• Face the truth. It won't take long for your employees to figure out many of your weaknesses anyway, Ross says. It's smarter to be upfront than to seem out of touch.
If you pretend to be perfect, it sends the message that you don't need anyone else. That diminishes employees' value. "It backfires," Ross said. "It's almost like the emperor has no clothes. The more you try to have a facade of perfection, the more magnified any weaknesses you have become."
• Seek input. Get feedback — positive and negative — from your employees. Be sure they feel it's safe to be honest, Ross says, otherwise the comments won't be authentic.
"Constructive feedback is one of the greatest gifts we can give to each other," she said.
• Take action. After getting feedback, tell people what you learned and what you plan to do with the information, Ross says. This should help you find staffers strong in the areas where you're weakest.
• Communicate often. Use technology to stay in touch with employees. It could involve daily internal email messages to keep people updated. "Use anything that works to have an open line of communication," Blair said.
• Give both sides. Be open about your foibles. You don't have to dwell on negatives, Blair says. Just show you have ways of addressing them. "It destroys credibility if you try to be something you're not," she said. "They will have a handle on you. The CEO is the person employees study the most in an organization."

 

 

Obama's $30 Billion Pledge: What's In It for You?

Obama's $30 Billion Pledge: What's In It for You?
Who wouldn't want thirty billion dollars? The business community, it seems. As you've probably read or heard, President Barack Obama is making news for proposing that $30 billion of the money that has been repaid from the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) be now diverted to community banks. From Money, Legal Issues, Feb, 2010
Read the article at: Obama's $30 Billion Pledge: What's In It for You?

Explain to people how it works minus much speak and not be able to generic online to a colorful proof. To show this is not easy but is sometimes needful.