Dr. Billie Blair heads the organizational change management firm, Change Strategists, Inc., which includes a non-profit focused division, Leading and Learning. The firm has offices in Los Angeles and Round Rock, TX and is comprised of 45 psychology and business professionals who are experts in management; strategy and tactics; and organizational change. Change Strategists, Inc. serves as strategy technical advisors to the leadership and boards of directors of a wide range of change oriented corporations and organizations, including: utilities, manufacturing, technology, bio-tech, banking, hospitality, government services, hospitals/health care systems, and national non-profits.

Dr. Blair holds a doctorate in organizational psychology and has worked with executives and CEOs for the past 25 years to institute strategy building systems, manage organizational change, assess employees for growth and leadership potential, and institute processes of change within their businesses and institutions. She has served in corporate and health care management positions, as well as professor of management/leadership and as college dean in California's largest public university system. She currently serves in leadership positions on numerous national boards and is ISS Corporate Governance Certified by the Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Blair's latest book is, ALL THE MOVING PARTS; ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE MANAGEMENT. Her latest book: VALUE + EMPLOYEES AS VALUERS is now available on our website, as well as from Amazon.

In offering the professional services of the firm's experts to leaders who understand the need for continuous change in their organizations, Dr. Blair states that her firm works with executives in organizations to finalize strategic goals and to help these leaders efficiently and effectively deal with opportunities of change. She says: "We enable CEOs and executives to handle change more quickly and effectively with the least impact on their employees, while safe-guarding the corporate identity." (Quoted from: Organizational Change Leader, November, 2004.)